Stone Family Association

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Matches 1,051 to 1,098 of 1,098

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1051 Twin to Francis. She married a Yankee soldier and moved North. Turbyfill, Daughter (I6970)
 
1052 Twin with David. Beam, John F. (I16235)
 
1053 Twin with John. Beam, Corporal David Cephas (I16236)
 
1054 Twin with Sarah. Hoffman, Susan S. (I9726)
 
1055 Twin with Sarah. Rudisill, Margaret Pauline (I16665)
 
1056 Twins with Ellen. Hoyl, Lucinda (I16120)
 
1057 Twins with Lucinda. Hoyl, Ellen (I16121)
 
1058 Two Crewson brothers came to United States with elder Morgan. William Thomas Crewson was was a preacher on horseback. Crewson, William Thomas (I2290)
 
1059 U.S., Date of Import: Mar 16, 2000, Internal; ; ; ; ; .

Broderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 5, Social Security Death Index:

U.S., Date of Import: Mar 16, 2000, Internal; ; ; ; ; .

Broderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 5, Social Security Death Index:

Index: U.S., Date of Import: Mar 16, 2000, Internal Ref. #1.111.5.50628.149

2 SOUR Broderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 5, Social Security Death

2 DATE DEC 1968

1 DEAT

1 NAME James /Costner/ 
Costner, James Monroe Jr (I5757)
 
1060 Very little documentation has been found concerning this generation. The records were probably lost when the old Church and house of the Cleric and Millstone Court House was burned by the British in 1779.

In 1792 son Derrick is recorded as a member of the Militia of Hunterdon County, Readington Township, New Jersey.

Residence:
1. Southampton, Pennsylvania: with parents 1721 - about 1737
2. Six Mile Run, New Jersey
3. Millstone, New Jersey: about 1760 to 1780
4. Berkeley County, West Virginia: with family, except son John, about 1780 to death 
Kroesen, Derrick Richard (I11165)
 
1061 Wagon maker in Crewson's Corners. Adopted Ivy who married Alex Cripps. Crewson, John H. (I2285)
 
1062 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Crewson, Walter Frederick John (I1045)
 
1063 Was a color bearer for 28th Georgia Regiment and died in service of CSA. Rudisill, Edmond Daniel (I15368)
 
1064 Was a Lieutenant during the Civil War. lived in Morganton, NC. Warlick, Pinkney A. (I18218)
 
1065 Was a member of the AFL, American Federation of labor Crewson, Alexander Burris (I5)
 
1066 Was a very skilled furniture craftsman. Although a frontiersman, he was the creator of fine furniture. From North Carolina to Missouri his settees, wardrobes, chairs, rockers and fine clocks of 17th and 18th century designs are still to be found in museums. He grew up in the carpenter shop of his father in the late 1700's when even the frontiersman wanted more than puncheoned half-log seats and rough slab beds, but did not have ready money to import period furniture. John Wills studied the furniture in local wealthy men's homes and built like same kind at a fraction of the cost of imports. He developed his own tools,finishes and wood ageing processes. Moved to Missouri in 1833 and settled near Daisy, Missouri. Wills, Johannes (I66)
 
1067 Was born in the territory which in 1700 became the town of Framingham, Mass., his birth being recorded in the adjoining town of Sudbury. He received, by deed from his father a part of the latter's lands in Framingham, and a further portion on his father's death in 1737,according to the latter's will. His estate was a part of what was known during the nineteenth century as the Bennett-Leland farm.
In the rate made 27 June 1710, to raise £10 for a town stock of ammunition, Samuel Stone was assessed 1s. 4d. On Mar. 1712,Samuel Stone and six others were appointed a committee to regulate disorders in the public meeting-house. During the summer of 1725, several military expeditions were sent into the wilderness, scouting for Indians; among these was a company of forty-four troopers from Framingham and Sherborn, commanded by Capt. Isaac Clark of Framingham, of which company Samuel Stone of Framingham was clerk. This company was, in active service from 21 Aug. to 18 Sept. 1725. (History of Framingham,"p. 188.) In his later years Samuel Stone became blind, and divided his property among his children, the son Joseph receiving the homestead; and he died about 1750, leaving no will and no estate requiring administration. 
Stone, Samuel III (I339)
 
1068 Was born, probably in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, probably between 1742 and 1752. He died in Mansfield Township, (then Sussex, since 1825) Warren County, New Jersey between 7 and 13 January 1819. The name of Francis' first wife and the probable mother of his children is unknown. However, Francis was probably first married in Bethlehem Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey between 1773 and 1778; she died before 20 February 1815 (Sussex County Deeds, E2:360). Francis may have married first JANE (see Jim Robert's comments further below).
If Francis and his first wife followed Dutch traditions rigidly in naming their children, he may have first married ELIZABETH and she may have been the daughter of couple named Jasper and Joanna.
Francis' son, Derrick/Richard6 Krusen, and his wife, Jane (Garrison) Krusen, named their first daughter Mary and their second daughter Sarah. If Jane (Garrison) Krusen was the daughter of John and Mary (Barbar) Garrison, as theorized further below, it follows that Derrick/Richard6's mother may have been named Sarah. Thus Francis may have first married SARAH . If so, she died, probably after September 1800, when the Krusens named their daughter Mary; if she had predeceased Mary (Barbar) Garrison, then the Krusens would have named their eldest daughter Sarah. However, Derrick/Richard and Jane did not follow Dutch naming pattern strictly; their fifth son (instead of their third), Richard, was finally named in honor of his father.
In any case, Francis was married second before 20 February 1815 to MARY (Sussex County Deeds, E2:360); she died after 13 January 1819. From the wording of Francis' will, it is obvious that Mary was not the mother of his children. Contrary to many sources, Mary ( ) Krusen was not Mary Blackledge or Mary Davis; this issue is discussed in detail further below.
Francis' paternal grandparents, Francis3 and Elizabeth (Van der Grift) Kroesen, had eight sons. According to Dutch naming practices, each of these eight sons should have named their eldest son Francis to honor Francis3. The name, Francis, had been introduced into the Kroesen family to honor Francis3' maternal grandfather, Francis2 Cregier (Martin1). Early in my research efforts, I discovered an existing theory that Derrick/Richard6 Krusen and Jasper Crusan, both of Greenwood, Steuben County, New York were the sons of a Francis Krusen who died in New Jersey in 1819. I then sought to determine which grandson of Francis3 was their father. The potential existed for eight grandsons of Francis3 Kroesen named in his honor. To date, the actual existence of any grandsons so named has been established for only three men, sons of Derrick4, Leonard4, and Francis4.
Francis, father of Derrick/Richard and Jasper, died in 1819. Therefore, Francis5 Kroesen (Leonard4, Francis3) can be ruled out; he died before 5 January 1804, when Leonard4 made his will (Bucks County, Pennsylvania Wills, 7:171, CFA). On similar evidence, Francis5 Kroesen (Francis4-3) can also be eliminated as a candidate; he did not die until 1844 (Metzgar). By process of elimination, using the known facts, the logical conclusion is that Francis5 (Derrick4, Francis3) was the father of Derrick/Richard and Jasper. After making this determination, I learned that Ruby Bell Arnold had arrived at the same conclusion long before me.
This conclusion is also strongly supported, once again, by examining naming patterns. Francis named his eldest son Derrick/Richard, his second son Jasper, and his third son John. In Dutch families, the eldest son was traditionally named after the paternal grandfather; the second son was named after the maternal grandfather; and the third son was named after the father. However, if the maternal grandfather predeceased the paternal grandfather, the order would be reversed, as was the case with the sons of Derrick4. Also, the naming pattern was sometimes altered to honor a paternal or maternal relative that had died. Unfortunately, I do not have a death date for John5 Krusen (Derrick4, Francis3, Derrick2, Garret1). However, we do know John5 lived and died in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania but not appear in the 1790 census. It seems probable that John, son of Francis, born in 1784, was named after his deceased uncle, John5.
Francis' sons, Derrick/Richard, Jasper and John all settled in Greenwood, Steuben County, New York. Following the deaths of Derrick/Richard and Jasper, John moved on to Licking County, Ohio. Descendants of Francis' brother, John, had also settled in Licking County, Ohio.
If I have correctly identified Francis as Francis5 (Derrick4, Francis3) then it follows that John moved to be near some of his close kin after his brothers died. This additional information provides strong support for the conclusion that Francis was the son of Derrick4.
The confusion created by the existence of at least three first cousins all named Francis Krusen has led to errors that remain widely accepted. This situation is exacerbated by the fact that at least two of the cousins both married women with the first name of Mary.
Mary Blackledge married a Francis Krusen at Neshaminy (Churchville), Bucks County, Pennsylvania (Metzgar) on 26 October 1770 (Pennsylvania Marriages); he is frequently, but ncorrectly, identified as Francis5 (Derrick4, Francis3, Derrick2, Garret1). Also, it is often stated that Mary Davis married a Francis Krusen; he is generally designated as Francis5 (Leonard4, Francis3, Derrick2, Garret1). However, Mary Blackledge and Mary Davis were actually the same woman; Mary (Blackledge) (Krewson) Davis was first married to Francis5 (Leonard4). This conclusion is drawn from an examination of her will.
In the will of "Mary Krewson or Davis" of Southampton (Bucks County, Pennsylvania Abstracts of Willis, Liber 10, page 338), she is identified as the daughter of John Blackledge. Mary Blackledge was first married to Francis Krewson; he died; and she then married Davis. This document, dated 7 July 1824, describes Mary as "advanced in years"; her will was proved later that same year on 7 December. Mary (Blackledge) (Krewson) Davis had sons named John Blackledge Krewson, Francis Krewson, and Leonard Krewson. Her daughters were named as Esther Krewson, Elizabeth Krewson, Rachel Hibbs, Mary Aurhton, and Bridget States. Based on her son's names, it is clear that Mary Blackledge married Francis5 (Leonard4); the origins of the Mary ( ) Krusen, second wife of Francis5 (Derrick4) remain unknown.
The names of her children and the will of her father confirm that Mary (Blackledge) (Krewson) Davis was born Mary3 Blackledge (John2, William1), daughter of John2 and Bridget (Grimes) Blackledge. In John2 Blackledge's will (dated 11 March 1775; #107; probated 1784; inventory filed 31 May 1785), his grandson, John Blackledge Krewson, is given money to be paid when he becomes 21 years old. John Blackledge also bequeathed land in Manor of Moreland, just outside of Philadelphia, to his daughter Mary.
Returning to the biography of our current subject, Francis5 Krusen (Derrick4, Francis3, Derrick2, Garret1), we learn that he he settled in Bethlhem, Hunterdon County, New Jersey by 1777 as evidenced by the following record of his service in the American Revolution:
It is certified, that the records of this office [Adjutant General, Trenton, New Jersey] show that Francis Kruser—Bethlehem Township, Hunterdon County—served as an Ensign, Captain F. Lock's Second Regiment, Hunterdon County Militia, May 10, 1777; Lieutenant, Captain Albert Opdycke's Company, Second Regiment, Hunterdon County Militia, June 1778; Captain, vice Opdycke, September 4, 1780; at battle of Monmouth, June 28, 1778—during the Revolutionary War (Arnold).
Francis Kruser is also documented as a Captain from Hunterdon County, New Jersey (William S. Stryker, Official Register of the Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Revolutionary War [Trenton, NJ: Wm. T. Nicholson & Co., Printers; 1872])).
One wonders what would have prompted Francis to migrate from Bucks County, Pennsylvania to Hunterdon County, New Jersey. The answer probably lies in Bucks County, Pennsylvania Criminal Records: 1697-1786. In File #2783, dated 28 September 1773, we find: "Recognizance Catherine De Gray of Northampton Township testify versus Francis Kroesen for fornication and bastardy of an illegitimate child." The most likely match for this record is Francis5 Krusen (Derrick4, Francis3, Derrick2, Garret1). This event may have caused him to relocate and increases the probability that his first wife was from Hunterdon County, New Jersey rather than Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Sharon Ann Kasa offered the following coments on this event: Catherine Gray, dau. of Peter Gray married... widower John Trisler... About 1772-1773, Peter Gray was born in Northampton, Bucks Co., PA. I have never managed to find his birth parents and now I wonder if they are possibly Francis Kroesen and Catherine Gray (14 Feb 2002).
In "New Jersey Rateables, 1778-1780" (Kenn Stryker-Rodda, Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey [Vol. 47, No. 3; Sep 1972]; Kenn is a descendant of the Stryker family of Greenwood, Steuben County, New York), Francis is listed "Frances Crusen" with 130 acres in Bethlehem Township, 2 horses, 6 horned cattle, 4 hogs as of June 1778. He was exempt from payingtaxes,probablybecauseofhismilitaryleadershiprole. BySeptember1780,"Francis Cruser" had only 50 acres, 3 hogs, and 4 horned cattle; perhaps his service in the militia had negative impact on both his finances and his farming. In other tax lists he appears as "Francis Crusen" in 1785, "Frances Krusom" in 1786, and "Frances Kruson" in 1789. Perhaps he left Hunterdon County in 1790 for he was not listed among the Hunterdon County taxpayers that year Hunterdon County New Jersey Taxpayers 1778-1797.
A "Francis Cruser" is listed in the 1790 census for Northumberland County, Pennsylvania between Thomas Phillips and Joseph Huffe. From other records, we know that Francis
sometimes spelled his name Kruser which would be a synonym for Cruser. Unfortunately, the census records were not returned by township for Northumberland County in 1790 which encompassed most of north central Pennsylvania at that time. Francis' brother, John, resided in Turbet Township, Northumberland County. However, John did not die until 1796 and he is not listed in the 1790 census. In 1800, "Mrs. Cruser" is listed as a head of household in Turbet. Also, the details in the census record pertaining to "Francis Cruser" do not match well with his family group. In 1790, the household of "Francis Cruser" included just one male age 16 or older; four free white females including three who were under age 16; and one slave. While Francis certainly had at least three daughters under the age of 16 in 1790, he had several sons as well. If "Francis Cruser" of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania is the same Francis who settled in Mansfield Township, (then Sussex, now) Warren County by the end of 1796 or sooner, then some of his children must have remained in New Jersey with other family members, perhaps to maintain Francis' own home and farm. It seems more reasonable to conclude that "Francis Cruser" of Northumberland County belongs to another branch of the Croesen family tree.
Francis died in Mansfield Township, (then Sussex, now) Warren County, New Jersey. He probably settled there by 8 Dec 1796, when "Francis Kruser" and Frederick Miller made the inventory of Michael Neigh Sr. of Mansfield Township (File 706S, New Jersey Colonial Documents: Calendar of Wills—1796-1800, 263). Apparently, it was common for the "Jersey Dutch" to change the final n in a surname to an r (Arnold).
On 20 February 1815, Francis Krusen and Mary his wife of Mansfield Township deeded 43 acres to Derrick Krusen also of Mansfield for $500, as witnessed by Joseph Thane and ElizabethMcIntire. ThispropertywasborderedbythatofJohnTitsworth,AbrahamTitsworth, John Woolever, and Robert Ramsey (Sussex County Deeds: E2:360).
"Francis Kruser" made his own will on 7 January 1819; it was recorded 20 July 1820 (Liber B of Wills, folios 52, 53).
In the name of God Amen. I Francis Kruser of the township of Mansfield County of Sussex & State of New Jersey, being weak in body of sound mind & memory for which blessing I most devoutly thank my god, do make & publish this my last will & testament in manner & form following, first it is my will & I do order that all my debts & funeral expenses be duly paid & satisfied, as soon as conveniently can be after my decease, I give & bequeath unto Joanna Petty wife of Aaron Petty my daughter, & unto Derrick Kruser, Jaspher Kruser & John Kruser my sons & to my other daughters Mary Hornbecker, Elizabeth Kruser & Margaret Kruser & my granddaughter Jimime McIntire & my wife Mary Kruser to them their heirs and assigns forever all my property both real & personal share & share alike except the share which is to go to my wife, which if she accept it is to be in lieu of her dower, & if anything remains of her share at my decease, it is my will that it be equally divided among my children & grand child above named to share & share alike. It is my will & I do here by order and direct my executors hereafter named to sell at publick or private sale all my real property lands tenements & herediaments of every description for the best price they can get for the same within one year after my decease, and the monies arising from the sale, the be equally divided share & share alike among all my children above named my wife, & granddaughter Jemima also to have an equal share with the rest, my will is that if my wife Mary will not accept her equal share with my other children named in lieu of her dower and release her right of dower to my heirs in order that the landed property may bring a good price, then in that case my will is that the share so as aforesaid willed to her, cease from her, & that she shall receive no part of it, but that her part shall be equally divided amongst my children & grand child before named. The reason that I will the sale of my landed property is because I considered it would be better & more to the advantage of my children & grandchildtohavetheirshareincashormoneythaninlotsofground. Iwill& order my executors hereafter named to put out the money or share coming to my grandchild Jemima McIntire to interest & secure the same by bond & mortgage until she attains the age of twenty one years, the interest to be paid to her annually for schooling & clothing, & when she attains the age of twenty one years, she is then to receive the whole unless she should die before she attains the age of twenty one years, & without having an heir or heirs, and in such case the money to be dividedamongstmychildrenorthesurvivorsofthemshare&sharealike. LastlyI doe hereby appoint my friends Jacob Taylor Esquire & Joseph Karr executors of this my last will & testament & guardians to my grandchild unto she chooses a guardian.
Elizabeth Martin, Henry Hankinson, and John Garrison witnessed Francis' mark on the document. Perhaps John Garrison was the father of Francis' daughter-in-law, Jane (Garrison) Krusen; Derrick/Richard and Jane (Garrison) Krusen named their eldest son John. "Francis Kruzen" was referred to as deceased in the inventory of his goods, dated 13 January 1819 (Liber C of Inventories, folio 287).
On 4 December 1819, Jacob Taylor and Joseph Kerr, executors of Francis' estate, along with John Krusen "did expose at public vendue or outcry... at the late dwelling house of Francis Krusen decd a certain farm or plantation... [in] Mansfield." John Krusen bought the 216-acre property with a bid of $2,216. It was bordered by John Vanness, Martin and Sutton. The deed was witnessed by Joseph Coryell and Aaron Petty (Sussex County Deeds, P2:315).
On 17 December 1819, Derick Krusen of Tioga, Tioga County, New York sold his 34 acre share of Francis' farm to his brother-in-law, "Peter Hornbaker" of Independence Township for $497; this lot was "a part of the farm of Francis Krusen decease." (Sussex County Deeds, P2:51).
On 8 April 1820 John Krusen and his wife, Jane, distributed 34.2 acres shares of Francis' farm to Margaret Krusen, Jasper Krusen of Mansfield, and Aaron Petty of Independence Township in separate deeds executed at a sale price of $369.36 each (Sussex County Deeds, P2:305).
Also on 8 April 1820 John Krusen and Jane of Mansfield sold 81.33 acres in Mansfield Township to Peter Hornbaker of Independence Township "excepting therefrom during the natural life of mary kruser widow and relick of Francis Kruser late of Mansfield decd a part of said lot that was laid off by Adam Runkle and Francis Nixon for part of her right of dower." This lot was also "apartofthefarmofFrancisKrusen." JosephCoryellandAaronPettywitnessedthistransaction (Sussex County Deeds, P2:278). Was this Adam Runkle identical with Adam Dawson Runkle, grandson of Jane (Foster) (Barbar) (Dawson) Van Buskirk?
Jim Roberts (hereinafter Roberts) provided the following summary on Francis via correspondence (11 May 1999):
First, Francis Krusen (#245 in the Croesen book). By the way, I listed two wives for Francis, (1) Jane, and (2) Mary (the one mentioned in the will). I can't say right off what made me make his first wife Jane. (I hope I didn't confuse her with his sonDerrick'swifeJaneGarrison!) Atanyrate,thewordingofthewillmademe think that Mary was a second wife. Here's what I said about Francis: "Francis Kroesen was taxed in Bethlehem twp., Hunterdon Co. NJ in 1778, 1780, 1785, 1786, and 1789, so it quite possible that his first wife was from that area. This is probably the Francis Cruser who appears in the 1790 Census of PA in Northumberland Co. He later moved to Warren Co. NJ (it was part of Sussex Co. at the time) where he lived many years, and died probably in January of 1820. Francis made his will in Mansfield twp., Sussex Co. NJ, on 7 January 1819; it was proved 20 Jan 1820... He names his wife as Mary Krusen, who was probably a second wife and not the mother of (all) the children, for after his property was to be sold, she was to receive an equal share with the children and the grandchild; if she would not accept this share, then she was not to receive any part of it, and her share was to be equally divided among the others. 
Krusen, Francis (I14155)
 
1069 Was in the Crown Point expedition in 1755. Bent, Jonathan (I14033)
 
1070 Was taken sick in the Publick Service and died upon the Frontier, praying that the charge of his sickness may be born by the Province. Winchester, Ebenezer (I5810)
 
1071 Was twin sister of Lydia Margaret. Rudasiller, Sarah Elizabeth (I18521)
 
1072 Was twin sister of Sarah A. Rudaciller, Lydia Margaret (I18520)
 
1073 Was wounded at Gettysburg and died at Point Lookout where he was a captain. Warlick, Maxwell Hoke (I18101)
 
1074 We have not been able to find William. A relative stated he had married a Swedish woman and got divorced and they let the child to be adopted by a couple in Osage City, Kansas. Then he went West I have not been able to prove this or disprove it at this time. Torbett, William (I363)
 
1075 Web content link:http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=88992999findagrave.com Duncan, Henry (I5010)
 
1076 Went to Missouri. Bess, William Henry (I10218)
 
1077 Went to Sweden in 1638 and there was made Ritemaster of King Gustave Adophus. They emigrated to New Amsterdam (New York) in 1666. Hoffman, Martinus (I15149)
 
1078 Went to work at a saw mill at age 15 in SC to make money for family. While there he broke his leg. He joined the Catawba Masonic Lodge #219 in 1917.
Deed filed by H. C. Goodson to Emerson Propst for 0 Jan 1917 in Newton paper. Bought house at foot of Knob in 1921. 
Propst, Emerson Lee (I14060)
 
1079 Went with her sister Abigail Rudisill and her husband Joseph Mendenhall to Arkansas where she died single. Rudisill, Katherine (I10341)
 
1080 When a few months old was taken by his parents in their removal into the then wilderness region which in 1700 became the town of Framingham. Here he received from his father about twenty acres south of the falls of the Sudbury River, and on 17 Apr. 1688, bought of Samuel Gookin and Samuel Howe a tract of two hundred acres, being a portion of a large grant they had secured a year before from the Indians.  This land adjoined other land of David Stone and included what during the nineteenth century was known as the Bennett-Leland farm.
David Stone appears as a trooper from Middlesex County in Capt. Thomas Prentice's troop of horse which served in the Narragansett Expedition in King Philip's War and took part in the Great Swamp Fight, 19 Dec. 1675. (Bodge's "Soldiers in King Philip's War," p.88.) That this soldier was David Stone of Framingham, appears to be established by the following deed: On 13 May 1732, David Stone, sen., of Framingham,yeoman, for love and good will conveys to his son (sic., means grandson) Zedekiah Stone of Framingham his right in the wilderness tract of land to be granted by the General Court to the soldiers in the Narragansett Expedition.(Worcester County Deeds, vol. 16, p 15.)
David Stone was one of the signers of the unsuccessful petition to the General Court for the incorporating of Framinghamon 2 Mar. 1692/3; was assessed 2s. 2d. on a tax rate made 27 June 1710 to raise £10 for a town stock of ammunition; and in 1718 was a selectman of Framingham where he died, probably shortly before 1 Apr. 1787, aged ninety years.
Abstract of the will of David Stone of Framingham, dated 10 Dec 1721. To wife Susanna my part of the homestall for life, and all my livestock, household goods, money, and bonds for life. To eldest son Samuel Stone a tract of land bounded by land or his own which I deeded him. Deer Swamp, my son Thomas' land, and the river; also my part of black oak meadow. My lands on west side of river to be equally divided between my sons Samuel and Thomas. After the decease of my wife my present part of the homestall to descend to my younger son Thomas. All money and bonds remaining after my wife's decease, to be equally divided among my four children Samuel, Thomas,Susanna, and Mary; and household goods and livestock remaining to be equally divided between said. two daughters. [Signed] David Stone. Witnesses: John Adams, John Bent, David Bent. Will consented to 1 Apr. 1737 by John and Susanna Noyes and Ephraim and Mary Curtis, children of deceased. 
Stone, David (I241)
 
1081 When Susan Hoyle married Thos. Jones he was a. widower. His first wife was Margaret Hoyle, daughter of Adam Hoyle, the brother of Susan Hoyle Jones' father. Margaret had six sons and one daughter before she died--L. M; Hoffman, see page 467 Hoyle, Susan Elmina (I2223)
 
1082 William and Laura are living with his brother Jacob in 1870 Gaston Co, NC, cens us. They appear to be married at that time. Jenkins, William Abram (I7562)
 
1083 William was a cousin. Family F4758
 
1084 William was wounded at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, taken prisoner, and held on David's Island where he died of blood poisoning. Grigg, William Spencer (I9636)
 
1085 Witnesses:Rev John Wilkie Darnley, Jane Agnes (I351)
 
1086 Witnesses:Rev John Wilkie Family F18
 
1087 written on back of one of 3 pages left from a family Bible: "Presented to Samuel and Ellen Flannagan with the best wishes of a sincere friend, July 16, 1862." Source (S17154)
 
1088 [Dillard Guthery.GED]

Source : Nancy Langston, 2407 Carver Drive, Roswell, NM 88201

!NOTE: Dillard Guthery.GED; ; ; ; , . Source Media Type: Other. Date of Import:

5 Mar 1999

!BIRTH: Dillard Guthery.GED; ; ; ; , . Source Media Type: Other. Date of

Import: 5 Mar 1999

!DEATH: Dillard Guthery.GED; ; ; ; , . Source Media Type: Other. Date of

Import: 5 Mar 1999 
Bearden, Edgar Dean (I6540)
 
1089 [Dillard Guthery.GED]

Source : Nancy Langston, 2407 Carver Drive, Roswell, NM 88201

Burial Boise City, Cimarron Co., OK

!NOTE: Dillard Guthery.GED; ; ; ; , . Source Media Type: Other. Date of Import:

5 Mar 1999

!BIRTH: Broderbund WFT Vol. 3, Ed. 1, Tree #0291, Date of Import: 29 Sep 1996;

; ; ; ; .

!BIRTH: Dillard Guthery.GED; ; ; ; , . Source Media Type: Other. Date of

Import: 5 Mar 1999

!DEATH: Broderbund WFT Vol. 3, Ed. 1, Tree #0291, Date of Import: 29 Sep 1996;

; ; ; ; .

!DEATH: Dillard Guthery.GED; ; ; ; , . Source Media Type: Other. Date of

Import: 5 Mar 1999

!MARRIAGE:Broderbund WFT Vol. 3, Ed. 1, Tree #0291, Date of Import: 29 Sep

1996; ; ; ; ; .

!MARRIAGE:Dillard Guthery.GED; ; ; ; , . Source Media Type: Other. Date of

Import: 5 Mar 1999 
Bearden, T. B. Larrimore (I6542)
 
1090 [Dillard Guthery.GED]

Source : Nancy Langston, 2407 Carver Drive, Roswell, NM 88201

Resided 1414 S. Union, Roswell, Chaves Co., NM

Baptism in Church OF Christ, Willis, Marshall, OK. Graduation in LPNNurse,

Hobbs Jr. College, Hobbs NM. Occupation: Business Nurse.

!NOTE: Dillard Guthery.GED; ; ; ; , . Source Media Type: Other. Date of Import:

5 Mar 1999

!BIRTH: Dillard Guthery.GED; ; ; ; , . Source Media Type: Other. Date of

Import: 5 Mar 1999

!MARRIAGE:Dillard Guthery.GED; ; ; ; , . Source Media Type: Other. Date of

Import: 5 Mar 1999

!MARRIAGE:Dillard Guthery.GED; ; ; ; , . Source Media Type: Other. Date of

Import: 5 Mar 1999 
Bearden, Frances Emma (I6541)
 
1091 [Dillard Guthery.GED]

Source : Nancy Langston, 2407 Carver Drive, Roswell, NM 88201

Resided in Cheyenne, WY.

Source T. B. Bearden: Resided Catalina Island CA. Buried Garden ofMemories,

Salinas, CA. Elton adopted Bobby Dan Walling who was Maudie'sson by an earlier

marriage.

!NOTE: Dillard Guthery.GED; ; ; ; , . Source Media Type: Other. Date of Import:

5 Mar 1999

!BIRTH: Dillard Guthery.GED; ; ; ; , . Source Media Type: Other. Date of

Import: 5 Mar 1999

!DEATH: Dillard Guthery.GED; ; ; ; , . Source Media Type: Other. Date of

Import: 5 Mar 1999 
Bearden, Elton Noah Greenville (I6543)
 
1092 [Dillard Guthery.GED]

Source: 1910 Census:Willis twp, Marshall,FM#158,PG#58,MF#1262

Buried Willis Cemetery - Source: Willis Cemetery located in MarshallCounty, OK

between Fobb Bottom Road and Oklahoma University Road on OkSH99 about one mile

North of Willis Bridge which spans the Red River.

Baptism Abt. 1895 in Church of Christ, Chickasaw Nation, IndianTerritory.

Burial 12 May 1964 Occupation: Farmer & Preacher.

Source DLG: marriage license Noah is listed as N. G. "Beard" instead ofBearden.

!NOTE: Dillard Guthery.GED; ; ; ; , . Source Media Type: Other. Date of Import:

5 Mar 1999

!BIRTH: Dillard Guthery.GED; ; ; ; , . Source Media Type: Other. Date of

Import: 5 Mar 1999

!DEATH: Dillard Guthery.GED; ; ; ; , . Source Media Type: Other. Date of

Import: 5 Mar 1999

!MARRIAGE:Dillard Guthery.GED; ; ; ; , . Source Media Type: Other. Date of

Import: 5 Mar 1999 
Bearden, Noah Greenville (I6536)
 
1093 \ deftab720\ pard\ pardeftab720\ f0\ fs26 \ cf0 John Carey came from Dublin in 1849 on board the Thomas Wright with his family landing in New Orleans. \ 'a0He fought in the civil war and ended up in Dayton, Ohio. Parents, Patrick and Mary. \ 'a0He was a grocer.}

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

<p>John Carey came from Dublin in 1849 on board the Thomas Wright with his family landing in New Orleans.  He fought in the civil war and ended up in Dayton, Ohio. Parents, Patrick and Mary.  He was a grocer.</p> 
Carey, John C (I323)
 
1094 \deftab720\itap1\trowd \taflags0 \trgaph108\trleft-108 \trbrdrt\brdrnil \trbrdrl\brdrnil \trbrdrt\brdrnil \trbrdrr\brdrnil \clvertalt \clshdrawnil \clwWidth13020\clftsWidth3 \clmart10 \clmarl10 \clmarb10 \clmarr10 \clbrdrt\brdrnil \clbrdrl\brdrnil \clbrdrb\brdrnil \clbrdrr\brdrs\brdrw20\brdrcf3 \clpadl140 \clpadr300 \gaph\cellx8640\pard\intbl\itap1\pardeftab720\sa266\f0\b\fs26 \cf2 Samuel Stone was a 17th century Puritan Minister who, together with Thomas Hooker, established the American town of Hartford, Connecticut.\b0 \par \pard\intbl\itap1\pardeftab720\cf2 Samuel Stone was born on 18th July 1602, the third son of John and Sarah Stone (nee Rogers), who lived in Fore Street, Hertford. He was baptised on 30th July of that year at All Saints Church and lived on the site now occupied by \i Baroosh\i0 , formerly Barclays Bank. \par \par In 1620 he left the town to study at Emmanuel College in Cambridge, from where he graduated. He was ordained on 8th July 1626 at Peterbough and a year later became curate at Sisted, Essex. Shortly aftwards his wife, Hope (nee Fletcher) gave birth to their first daughter, Sarah. \par \par Stone was a Puritan. The Puritans were Protestants who wanted to purify the Church of England of its' ceremony and other aspects that they thought were \i Catholic\i0 . They wanted the powers of the lordly bishops reduced and condemned priestly vestments, church ornaments and music. They wanted the church restored to its' ancient purity and simplicity. This attitude put them in confrontation with The Crown and they were supressed. \par \par In 1620, the same year that Samuel Stone left Hertford for Cambridge, a band of }} called The Pilgrim Fathers crossed the Atlantic in \i The Mayflower\i0 and founded the settlement of New Plymouth. \par \par Seventeen years later, in 1633, another ship named \i Griffin\i0 made a similar journey, with Samuel Stone on board, together with his friend Thomas Hooker. They arrived in Boston on 4th September 1633 and a few weeks later Stone became Teacher of Church. The following year he became a Freeman. \par \par An area some 100 miles to the South-West had long been inhabited by native Algonquin Indians. At the same time as Stone and Hooker were arriving in Boston, the Dutch were establishing a fort and trading post called \i House of Hope\i0 , located at the end of the navigable portion of the Connecticut River. \par \par In 1636, Thomas Hooker and Samuel Stone led their congregation from New Towne (now Cambridge, MASS) and formed a colony at \i House of Hope\i0 , making peace with the local Indians and renaming the town they called Saukiog as Hartford. \par \par In the following years Stone's wife, Hope, had two more daughters - Rebecca and Mary. Hope died in 1640 and in the following year he married again to Elizabeth Allen. \par \par Samuel Stone died on 20th July 1663, aged 61.\fs24 \cf0 \cell \pard\tx560\tx1120\tx1680\tx2240\tx2800\tx3360\tx3920\tx4480\tx5040\tx5600\tx6160\tx6720\pardirnatural\cf0 Samuel Stone was a 17th century Puritan Minister who, together with Thomas Hooker, established the American town of Hartford, Connecticut. \par Samuel Stone was born on 18th July 1602, the third son of John and Sarah Stone (nee Rogers), who lived in Fore Street, Hertford. He was baptised on 30th July of that year at All Saints Church and lived on the site now occupied by Baroosh, formerly Barclays Bank. \par \par \par In 1620 he left the town to study at Emmanuel College in Cambridge, from where he graduated. He was ordained on 8th July 1626 at Peterbough and a year later became curate at Sisted, Essex. Shortly aftwards his wife, Hope (nee Fletcher) gave birth to their first daughter, Sarah. \par \par \par Stone was a Puritan. The Puritans were Protestants who wanted to purify the Church of England of its' ceremony and other aspects that they thought were Catholic. They wanted the powers of the lordly bishops reduced and condemned priestly vestments, church ornaments and music. They wanted the church restored to its' ancient purity and simplicity. This attitude put them in confrontation with The Crown and they were supressed. \par \par \par In 1620, the same year that Samuel Stone left Hertford for Cambridge, a band of Separatists called The Pilgrim Fathers crossed the Atlantic in The Mayflower and founded the settlement of New Plymouth. \par \par \par Seventeen years later, in 1633, another ship named Griffin made a similar journey, with Samuel Stone on board, together with his friend Thomas Hooker. They arrived in Boston on 4th September 1633 and a few weeks later Stone became Teacher of Church. The following year he became a Freeman. \par \par \par An area some 100 miles to the South-West had long been inhabited by native Algonquin Indians. At the same time as Stone and Hooker were arriving in Boston, the Dutch were establishing a fort and trading post called House of Hope, located at the end of the navigable portion of the Connecticut River. \par \par \par In 1636, Thomas Hooker and Samuel Stone led their congregation from New Towne (now Cambridge, MASS) and formed a colony at House of Hope, making peace with the local Indians and renaming the town they called Saukiog as Hartford. \par \par \par In the following years Stone's wife, Hope, had two more daughters - Rebecca and Mary. Hope died in 1640 and in the following year he married again to Elizabeth Allen. \par \par \par Samuel Stone died on 20th July 1663, aged 61.}

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Samuel Stone was a 17th century Puritan Minister who, together with Thomas Hooker, established the American town of Hartford, Connecticut.

Samuel Stone was born on 18th July 1602, the third son of John and Sarah Stone (nee Rogers), who lived in Fore Street, Hertford. He was baptised on 30th July of that year at All Saints Church and lived on the site now occupied by Baroosh, formerly Barclays Bank.

 

In 1620 he left the town to study at Emmanuel College in Cambridge, from where he graduated. He was ordained on 8th July 1626 at Peterbough and a year later became curate at Sisted, Essex. Shortly aftwards his wife, Hope (nee Fletcher) gave birth to their first daughter, Sarah.

 

Stone was a Puritan. The Puritans were Protestants who wanted to purify the Church of England of its' ceremony and other aspects that they thought were Catholic. They wanted the powers of the lordly bishops reduced and condemned priestly vestments, church ornaments and music. They wanted the church restored to its' ancient purity and simplicity. This attitude put them in confrontation with The Crown and they were supressed.

 

In 1620, the same year that Samuel Stone left Hertford for Cambridge, a band of Separatists called The Pilgrim Fathers crossed the Atlantic in The Mayflower and founded the settlement of New Plymouth.

 

Seventeen years later, in 1633, another ship named Griffin made a similar journey, with Samuel Stone on board, together with his friend Thomas Hooker. They arrived in Boston on 4th September 1633 and a few weeks later Stone became Teacher of Church. The following year he became a Freeman.

 

An area some 100 miles to the South-West had long been inhabited by native Algonquin Indians. At the same time as Stone and Hooker were arriving in Boston, the Dutch were establishing a fort and trading post called House of Hope, located at the end of the navigable portion of the Connecticut River.

 

In 1636, Thomas Hooker and Samuel Stone led their congregation from New Towne (now Cambridge, MASS) and formed a colony at House of Hope, making peace with the local Indians and renaming the town they called Saukiog as Hartford.

 

In the following years Stone's wife, Hope, had two more daughters - Rebecca and Mary. Hope died in 1640 and in the following year he married again to Elizabeth Allen.

 

Samuel Stone died on 20th July 1663, aged 61.



-- MERGED NOTE ------------

\deftab720\itap1\trowd \taflags0 \trgaph108\trleft-108 \trbrdrt\brdrnil \trbrdrl\brdrnil \trbrdrt\brdrnil \trbrdrr\brdrnil \clvertalt \clshdrawnil \clwWidth13020\clftsWidth3 \clmart10 \clmarl10 \clmarb10 \clmarr10 \clbrdrt\brdrnil \clbrdrl\brdrnil \clbrdrb\brdrnil \clbrdrr\brdrs\brdrw20\brdrcf3 \clpadl140 \clpadr300 \gaph\cellx8640\pard\intbl\itap1\pardeftab720\sa266\f0\b\fs26 \cf2 Samuel Stone was a 17th century Puritan Minister who, together with Thomas Hooker, established the American town of Hartford, Connecticut.\b0 \par \pard\intbl\itap1\pardeftab720\cf2 Samuel Stone was born on 18th July 1602, the third son of John and Sarah Stone (nee Rogers), who lived in Fore Street, Hertford. He was baptised on 30th July of that year at All Saints Church and lived on the site now occupied by \i Baroosh\i0 , formerly Barclays Bank. \par \par In 1620 he left the town to study at Emmanuel College in Cambridge, from where he graduated. He was ordained on 8th July 1626 at Peterbough and a year later became curate at Sisted, Essex. Shortly aftwards his wife, Hope (nee Fletcher) gave birth to their first daughter, Sarah. \par \par Stone was a Puritan. The Puritans were Protestants who wanted to purify the Church of England of its' ceremony and other aspects that they thought were \i Catholic\i0 . They wanted the powers of the lordly bishops reduced and condemned priestly vestments, church ornaments and music. They wanted the church restored to its' ancient purity and simplicity. This attitude put them in confrontation with The Crown and they were supressed. \par \par In 1620, the same year that Samuel Stone left Hertford for Cambridge, a band of }} called The Pilgrim Fathers crossed the Atlantic in \i The Mayflower\i0 and founded the settlement of New Plymouth. \par \par Seventeen years later, in 1633, another ship named \i Griffin\i0 made a similar journey, with Samuel Stone on board, together with his friend Thomas Hooker. They arrived in Boston on 4th September 1633 and a few weeks later Stone became Teacher of Church. The following year he became a Freeman. \par \par An area some 100 miles to the South-West had long been inhabited by native Algonquin Indians. At the same time as Stone and Hooker were arriving in Boston, the Dutch were establishing a fort and trading post called \i House of Hope\i0 , located at the end of the navigable portion of the Connecticut River. \par \par In 1636, Thomas Hooker and Samuel Stone led their congregation from New Towne (now Cambridge, MASS) and formed a colony at \i House of Hope\i0 , making peace with the local Indians and renaming the town they called Saukiog as Hartford. \par \par In the following years Stone's wife, Hope, had two more daughters - Rebecca and Mary. Hope died in 1640 and in the following year he married again to Elizabeth Allen. \par \par Samuel Stone died on 20th July 1663, aged 61.\fs24 \cf0 \cell \pard\tx560\tx1120\tx1680\tx2240\tx2800\tx3360\tx3920\tx4480\tx5040\tx5600\tx6160\tx6720\pardirnatural\cf0 Samuel Stone was a 17th century Puritan Minister who, together with Thomas Hooker, established the American town of Hartford, Connecticut. \par Samuel Stone was born on 18th July 1602, the third son of John and Sarah Stone (nee Rogers), who lived in Fore Street, Hertford. He was baptised on 30th July of that year at All Saints Church and lived on the site now occupied by Baroosh, formerly Barclays Bank. \par \par \par In 1620 he left the town to study at Emmanuel College in Cambridge, from where he graduated. He was ordained on 8th July 1626 at Peterbough and a year later became curate at Sisted, Essex. Shortly aftwards his wife, Hope (nee Fletcher) gave birth to their first daughter, Sarah. \par \par \par Stone was a Puritan. The Puritans were Protestants who wanted to purify the Church of England of its' ceremony and other aspects that they thought were Catholic. They wanted the powers of the lordly bishops reduced and condemned priestly vestments, church ornaments and music. They wanted the church restored to its' ancient purity and simplicity. This attitude put them in confrontation with The Crown and they were supressed. \par \par \par In 1620, the same year that Samuel Stone left Hertford for Cambridge, a band of Separatists called The Pilgrim Fathers crossed the Atlantic in The Mayflower and founded the settlement of New Plymouth. \par \par \par Seventeen years later, in 1633, another ship named Griffin made a similar journey, with Samuel Stone on board, together with his friend Thomas Hooker. They arrived in Boston on 4th September 1633 and a few weeks later Stone became Teacher of Church. The following year he became a Freeman. \par \par \par An area some 100 miles to the South-West had long been inhabited by native Algonquin Indians. At the same time as Stone and Hooker were arriving in Boston, the Dutch were establishing a fort and trading post called House of Hope, located at the end of the navigable portion of the Connecticut River. \par \par \par In 1636, Thomas Hooker and Samuel Stone led their congregation from New Towne (now Cambridge, MASS) and formed a colony at House of Hope, making peace with the local Indians and renaming the town they called Saukiog as Hartford. \par \par \par In the following years Stone's wife, Hope, had two more daughters - Rebecca and Mary. Hope died in 1640 and in the following year he married again to Elizabeth Allen. \par \par \par Samuel Stone died on 20th July 1663, aged 61.}

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

\deftab720\itap1\trowd \taflags0 \trgaph108\trleft-108 \trbrdrt\brdrnil \trbrdrl\brdrnil \trbrdrt\brdrnil \trbrdrr\brdrnil \clvertalt \clshdrawnil \clwWidth13020\clftsWidth3 \clmart10 \clmarl10 \clmarb10 \clmarr10 \clbrdrt\brdrnil \clbrdrl\brdrnil \clbrdrb\brdrnil \clbrdrr\brdrs\brdrw20\brdrcf3 \clpadl140 \clpadr300 \gaph\cellx8640\pard\intbl\itap1\pardeftab720\sa266\f0\b\fs26 \cf2 Samuel Stone was a 17th century Puritan Minister who, together with Thomas Hooker, established the American town of Hartford, Connecticut.\b0 \par \pard\intbl\itap1\pardeftab720\cf2 Samuel Stone was born on 18th July 1602, the third son of John and Sarah Stone (nee Rogers), who lived in Fore Street, Hertford. He was baptised on 30th July of that year at All Saints Church and lived on the site now occupied by \i Baroosh\i0 , formerly Barclays Bank. \par \par In 1620 he left the town to study at Emmanuel College in Cambridge, from where he graduated. He was ordained on 8th July 1626 at Peterbough and a year later became curate at Sisted, Essex. Shortly aftwards his wife, Hope (nee Fletcher) gave birth to their first daughter, Sarah. \par \par Stone was a Puritan. The Puritans were Protestants who wanted to purify the Church of England of its' ceremony and other aspects that they thought were \i Catholic\i0 . They wanted the powers of the lordly bishops reduced and condemned priestly vestments, church ornaments and music. They wanted the church restored to its' ancient purity and simplicity. This attitude put them in confrontation with The Crown and they were supressed. \par \par In 1620, the same year that Samuel Stone left Hertford for Cambridge, a band of }} called The Pilgrim Fathers crossed the Atlantic in \i The Mayflower\i0 and founded the settlement of New Plymouth. \par \par Seventeen years later, in 1633, another ship named \i Griffin\i0 made a similar journey, with Samuel Stone on board, together with his friend Thomas Hooker. They arrived in Boston on 4th September 1633 and a few weeks later Stone became Teacher of Church. The following year he became a Freeman. \par \par An area some 100 miles to the South-West had long been inhabited by native Algonquin Indians. At the same time as Stone and Hooker were arriving in Boston, the Dutch were establishing a fort and trading post called \i House of Hope\i0 , located at the end of the navigable portion of the Connecticut River. \par \par In 1636, Thomas Hooker and Samuel Stone led their congregation from New Towne (now Cambridge, MASS) and formed a colony at \i House of Hope\i0 , making peace with the local Indians and renaming the town they called Saukiog as Hartford. \par \par In the following years Stone's wife, Hope, had two more daughters - Rebecca and Mary. Hope died in 1640 and in the following year he married again to Elizabeth Allen. \par \par Samuel Stone died on 20th July 1663, aged 61.\fs24 \cf0 \cell \pard\tx560\tx1120\tx1680\tx2240\tx2800\tx3360\tx3920\tx4480\tx5040\tx5600\tx6160\tx6720\pardirnatural\cf0 Samuel Stone was a 17th century Puritan Minister who, together with Thomas Hooker, established the American town of Hartford, Connecticut. \par Samuel Stone was born on 18th July 1602, the third son of John and Sarah Stone (nee Rogers), who lived in Fore Street, Hertford. He was baptised on 30th July of that year at All Saints Church and lived on the site now occupied by Baroosh, formerly Barclays Bank. \par \par \par In 1620 he left the town to study at Emmanuel College in Cambridge, from where he graduated. He was ordained on 8th July 1626 at Peterbough and a year later became curate at Sisted, Essex. Shortly aftwards his wife, Hope (nee Fletcher) gave birth to their first daughter, Sarah. \par \par \par Stone was a Puritan. The Puritans were Protestants who wanted to purify the Church of England of its' ceremony and other aspects that they thought were Catholic. They wanted the powers of the lordly bishops reduced and condemned priestly vestments, church ornaments and music. They wanted the church restored to its' ancient purity and simplicity. This attitude put them in confrontation with The Crown and they were supressed. \par \par \par In 1620, the same year that Samuel Stone left Hertford for Cambridge, a band of Separatists called The Pilgrim Fathers crossed the Atlantic in The Mayflower and founded the settlement of New Plymouth. \par \par \par Seventeen years later, in 1633, another ship named Griffin made a similar journey, with Samuel Stone on board, together with his friend Thomas Hooker. They arrived in Boston on 4th September 1633 and a few weeks later Stone became Teacher of Church. The following year he became a Freeman. \par \par \par An area some 100 miles to the South-West had long been inhabited by native Algonquin Indians. At the same time as Stone and Hooker were arriving in Boston, the Dutch were establishing a fort and trading post called House of Hope, located at the end of the navigable portion of the Connecticut River. \par \par \par In 1636, Thomas Hooker and Samuel Stone led their congregation from New Towne (now Cambridge, MASS) and formed a colony at House of Hope, making peace with the local Indians and renaming the town they called Saukiog as Hartford. \par \par \par In the following years Stone's wife, Hope, had two more daughters - Rebecca and Mary. Hope died in 1640 and in the following year he married again to Elizabeth Allen. \par \par \par Samuel Stone died on 20th July 1663, aged 61.} 
Stone, Rev. Samuel (I1093)
 
1095 \deftab720\pard\pardeftab720\f0\fs26 \cf0 Interesting finding Absolom Daugherty's father, George. \'a0Born in Ireland in April 1750, Valley Lagan, Donegal, Ireland. \par \par George fought in the Revolutionary War; battles of Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth. \'a0In November 1776, he was taken captive while serving under Capt. Henry Miller. \'a0\'a0He was a Sargent. He was taken captive at Fort Washington and taken to New York to be exchanged. \'a0He later crossed the Delaware with George Washington at the Battle of Monmouth. \'a0Discharged in 1780. \'a0\'a0George married a Mcallister, a relative of Mom's Torbet clan. Still tracking that down. \par \par George-Absolom-Joseph-Jessie-Sara Carey-John stone \par \par George's grandsons, Joseph and Samuel fought in the Civil war on both campaigns for Fredericksburg. \'a0Joseph was shot twice and rowed across the Rappahannock river in the face of Lee's sharpshooters. Joseph ended up as Captain for his service. \'a0Samuel was a Sargent and moved with Joseph from Pennslyvania to Ohio after the war.\fs24 \par \pard\tx560\tx1120\tx1680\tx2240\tx2800\tx3360\tx3920\tx4480\tx5040\tx5600\tx6160\tx6720\pardirnatural\cf0 Interesting finding Absolom Daugherty's father, George. \'a0Born in Ireland in April 1750, Valley Lagan, Donegal, Ireland. \par \par \par George fought in the Revolutionary War; battles of Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth. \'a0In November 1776, he was taken captive while serving under Capt. Henry Miller. \'a0\'a0He was a Sargent. He was taken captive at Fort Washington and taken to New York to be exchanged. \'a0He later crossed the Delaware with George Washington at the Battle of Monmouth. \'a0Discharged in 1780. \'a0\'a0George married a Mcallister, a relative of Mom's Torbet clan. Still tracking that down. \par \par \par George-Absolom-Joseph-Jessie-Sara Carey-John stone \par \par \par \par George's grandsons, Joseph and Samuel fought in the Civil war on both campaigns for Fredericksburg. \'a0Joseph was shot twice and rowed across the Rappahannock river in the face of Lee's sharpshooters. Joseph ended up as Captain for his service. \'a0Samuel was a Sargent and moved with Joseph from Pennslyvania to Ohio after the war.}

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Interesting finding Absolom Daugherty's father, George.  Born in Ireland in April 1750, Valley Lagan, Donegal, Ireland.

George fought in the Revolutionary War; battles of Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth.  In November 1776, he was taken captive while serving under Capt. Henry Miller.   He was a Sargent. He was taken captive at Fort Washington and taken to New York to be exchanged.  He later crossed the Delaware with George Washington at the Battle of Monmouth.  Discharged in 1780.   George married a Mcallister, a relative of Mom's Torbet clan. Still tracking that down.

George-Absolom-Joseph-Jessie-Sara Carey-John stone

George's grandsons, Joseph and Samuel fought in the Civil war on both campaigns for Fredericksburg.  Joseph was shot twice and rowed across the Rappahannock river in the face of Lee's sharpshooters. Joseph ended up as Captain for his service.  Samuel was a Sargent and moved with Joseph from Pennslyvania to Ohio after the war. 

Daugherty, George Sr (I1156)
 
1096 Family F1671
 
1097  It is with regret to announce the passing of Elizabeth (Beth) Crewson on July 11, 2015 at the age of 91. Beth passed away peacefully in her home. The family was blessed with two children, Helen and Murray. Be this survived by her daughter Helen Leckie of Prince George and sisters Joan Garnett of Wakefield, Quebec, and Louise Bond of Brandon, Manitoba. Beth was predeceased by her husband George in 1989 and her son Murray in 2004. Beth was born in Russell, Manitoba on January 25, 1924 and was raised in the community of Shellmouth. Following her education, she taught at the Indian Residential School at Portage le Prairie, then the Rural School of Ferriss. In 1945 she married George Crewson and they farmed for 15 years in the Edwin District. In 1960 the family moved to Portage le Prairie where George and Beth were active members of the CO-OP and Credit Union and served on their Boards. After George passed away Beth fulfilled her dream to travel and spent two years in the Bahamas. Beth moved to Prince George in 1998 and was proud to call Prince George her home because of the kindness of its people and the willingness of others to help those in need. She was a proud member of the White Eagles Lodge and lived their devotion to kindness and love. She was an avid supporter of the Old Time Fiddler's Association and Hospice House. The Senior Centers of Prince George were important to Beth where she could share a story or two over a meal,tap her feet to the sounds of a fiddle, and enjoy the various entertainments over the years. She loved to play cribbage, go on long drives, and have good conversation. In her later years Beth was appreciative of the care and kindness shown to her by the staff at Rainbow Lodge and Home & Community Care. Beth's purpose in life was to serve which she did with grace and love. Her spirit was a shining light of love that touched everyone who met her and will live on in our hearts forever. 
  
Garnett, Eliizabeth (I12010)
 
1098 Ægtefælle: Alexander Perley Hill, Sr. Family F1330
 

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